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As more buyers choose hybrids over electric cars, Porsche unveils a new hybrid 911.

As more buyers choose hybrids over electric cars, Porsche unveils a new hybrid 911.
As more buyers choose hybrids over electric cars, Porsche unveils a new hybrid 911.
Written by Newils
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On Tuesday, Porsche introduced the first hybrid iteration of the 911, the company’s most well-known sports vehicle. This development may contribute to the growing acceptance of electric motors in performance vehicles.

As more buyers choose hybrids over electric cars, Porsche unveils a new hybrid 911.

As more buyers choose hybrids over electric cars, Porsche unveils a new hybrid 911.

A significant development in the history of one of the most famous cars in the world is also represented by this move. Due to their generally higher fuel efficiency without sacrificing power, hybrids are now seen in many different kinds of automobiles. In the US, they’ve grown in popularity even as sales of fully electric versions have begun to decline.

Porsche, a division of Volkswagen AG based in Germany, is currently selling plug-in hybrid vehicles, such as the four-door Panamera e-Hybrid and SUV Cayenne e-Hybrid; however, a hybrid 911 is a different story.

At first, the very capable 911 Carrera GTS will be the sole vehicle offered with hybrid power. The car’s six-cylinder gas engine will be assisted by an electric motor built inside the eight-speed transmission, giving the next 911 variant up to 532 horsepower—59 more than the current Carrera GTS model.

A 2025 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Cabriolet.

Few vehicles have a gasoline engine that defines them as much as the 911, and few automakers have a single model that defines them as much as Porsche does. Porsche’s flagship model, the 911, is still sold in greater numbers than sports cars these days.There are design cues from the 911 that can be seen in the rounded corners and sloping hoods of the Porsche Macan and Cayenne SUVs.

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This car will not be a plug-in hybrid, unlike earlier Porsche hybrid models, which is another significant departure for the brand. Plug-in hybrid cars such as the Porsche Cayenne and Panamera e-Hybrid may have their batteries charged both by the cars’ internal engines and by an EV charger.

Once completely charged, those models can also travel a certain distance using only electricity. The 911 Carrera GTS will run entirely on battery power from its engine and brakes, making it a fully autonomous hybrid. Its electric power alone will not be sufficient to propel it over long distances.

Porsche offers fully electric vehicles, such as the Taycan and the recently released Macan Electric SUV, in addition to hybrids. Executives, however, have stated that because the 911’s engineering is so distinctive and core to the Porsche brand, it will be the final Porsche to go entirely electric.

What distinguishes this automobile as a 911 is the removal of the rear engine, which gave it its unique design and rear-weighted driving sensation. Without causing those kinds of problems, Porsche’s new hybrid model—which retains its gas engine positioned in the back—will be the closest thing to an electric 911.

The US is still seeing an increase in electric car sales, although it has slowed down significantly in recent months. In the meantime, hybrid car sales are rising more quickly. The comparatively high cost of the models that are currently on sale and the dearth of dependable public EV chargers have been blamed for the decline in EV sales. Hybrid vehicles typically cost less and don’t need to be charged.

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However, this specific mix won’t be inexpensive. The 2025 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS is expected to start at approximately $165,000.

The hybrid was driven around the renowned Nürburgring Nordschleife racetrack in Germany in 7 minutes and 17 seconds by a Porsche test driver, which is 8.7 seconds quicker than a comparable current-generation 911 Carrra GTS. The faster time also suggests that the car’s handling isn’t compromised by the additional weight of batteries and electric motors, which is encouraging because the Nürburgring is a twisting, difficult course.

The new hybrid variant was unveiled almost 60 years after Porsche first introduced the 911. Although it was first shown in 1963, the 911 was not put into production until 1964. It was a more substantial and potent upgrade than Porsche’s 356 base model.

Small rear seats and engines placed behind the back wheels were features shared by both cars, which were only manufactured together for a few years. The design was reminiscent of the Volkswagen Beetle, which Ferdinand Porsche Sr.—the father of Ferdinand “Ferry” Porsche—designed. Ferdinand Porsche Sr. also built the 356.

Ferdinand “Butzi” Porsche, Ferry’s son, worked on the 911’s design, which was based on the 356’s teardrop shape. From the first model, its shape has essentially not changed, even with the increasingly stifling rear seats.

As more buyers choose hybrids over electric cars, Porsche unveils a new hybrid 911.As more buyers choose hybrids over electric cars, Porsche unveils a new hybrid 911.

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