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Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.

Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.
Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.
Written by Newils
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An overhead shot taken at Renton Municipal Airport near the Boeing Renton factory in Renton, Washington, shows parked unpainted Boeing 737 MAX aircraft.

Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.

Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.

Boeing announced on Thursday that it would be presenting its solution to US authorities next week to address quality issues with its assembly line.

After a hole ripped wide in the side of an aircraft 737 Max a month prior, the Federal Aviation Administration ordered the plan in late February.

Following an assessment of Boeing’s production line and that of its primary 737 Max supplier, the FAA reported that it discovered “multiple instances where the companies allegedly failed to comply with manufacturing quality control requirements.” Boeing has until next week to provide a plan, as per the 90-day notice given to it.

Brian West, the chief financial officer of Boeing, stated on Thursday that during the plan’s creation, there was “a lot of dialogue” between Boeing and the FAA, including two check-ins.

At a conference on Thursday hosted by Wolfe Research, he stated, “The engagement is constructive.” “I anticipate receiving some positive feedback next week.”

Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.

Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.

Separately on Thursday, FAA Administrator Mike Whitaker stated that the proposal is “not the end of the process; it’s the beginning.”

In an interview with ABC News, Whitaker stated, “It’s going to be a long road to get back to where they need to be making safe airplanes.”

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West acknowledged that the plan’s presentation is “not a finish line” and that Boeing’s safety efforts are presently concentrated on three areas: tools, training, and “simplification of our work instructions.”

“Our goal is to ensure that the mechanic is equipped to perform the task as intended,” stated West. “We have a lot of people working very hard to make sure that we achieve improvements across the board in those areas, even though they are basic but important basics.”

West also echoed the concerns expressed by a few airline executives regarding Boeing’s quality and production-related delays.

“Some of the production supply chain issues that we’re up against have frustrated and disappointed our customers,” West stated. “And while I can appreciate your frustration, we should concentrate on the actions that are currently in progress for the benefit of our clients and the industry supply chain.”

He stated that Spirit Aero Systems, a crucial supplier, is currently figuring out how to divide up the work it does for other businesses like Boeing’s main rival, Airbus, and that Boeing still intends to acquire Spirit.

Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.

Boeing is on schedule to submit quality control fixes by the FAA deadline.

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